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Supplements for pain relief 4 months 4 weeks ago #3842769

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I stopped eating vegetables from the deadly nightshade family: tomatoes in particular. And I miss them--especially the variety of small cherry sized tomatoes we grow here. I was eating them like candy--probably an overabundance on my part. And much of the pain from arthritis has gone.

As others have said, check with your doctor and/or nutritionist. Your body isn't a science project.
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Supplements for pain relief 4 months 4 weeks ago #3842825

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Aida wrote: My GP told me that people often give up dairy without substantial evidence that it is bad for them. Making up the calcium needed from other foods is hit and miss. . Most of us are not qualified nutritionists.
A better idea might be to give up sugar and soda drinks.


You are totally right about sodas.

People giving up on dairies must be followed by their GP to make up for calcium.
If they just remove the dairies and do not substitute it by something else than that is bad.

Entire civilisations in Asia did not consume dairies for centuries.
Asia for eg with Japanese having one of the longest life span.
But in Asia people have a diet very rich in all kinds of green veggies daily ( which are dull of calcium), and fresh fish, sesame and tofu all loaded with calcium.

I used to love dairies. Had them all my life until I got very sick ten years ago and found out that I was dairy intolerant unknowingly like many other people.

Over night my health has improved deeply, no more inflammation and much more energy and so did two of my friends for different reasons ( rheumatoid arthritis) but they felt instantly better. And never had any calcium deficiency but have enough knowledge in nutrition to maintain a balanced diet in accordance with my needs.

I believe there is no one size fit all as we all have very different DNA eg 14% of Brits are lactose intolerant as opposed to 75% of French or Asians. So it really depends on our DNA I guess and where we come from.

www.openaccessgovernment.org/why-do-euro...tolerance-eu/140605/
Two-thirds of adults have some degree of lactose intolerance
Most European adults have evolved to consume milk and other dairy products without discomfort.

However, for the majority of adults in the world, this is not the case. Two-thirds of adults in the world today, and almost all adults 5,000 years ago, cannot consume milk without encountering cramps, diarrhoea, and flatulence. This is known as lactose intolerance.
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Last edit: by Amandine.

Supplements for pain relief 4 months 4 weeks ago #3842895

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Supplements for pain relief 4 months 3 weeks ago #3843135

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Thank you for these really helpful replies :xxx:

Especially about turmeric and blood thinners and the calcium info ... strangely milk - even skimmed - makes me itch but I can tolerate yoghurt no problem and have just started having Kefir yoghurt which I am finding beneficial in a couple of ways and it is low in fat too .... and YES we are all different too.

We have a lotta wisdom and good sage advice between us on Buzz but yes of course always check with medical experts ... sometimes there's a lonnnnng waitlist though!!
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Supplements for pain relief 4 months 3 weeks ago #3843139

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Summerdancing wrote: I stopped eating vegetables from the deadly nightshade family: tomatoes in particular. And I miss them--especially the variety of small cherry sized tomatoes we grow here. I was eating them like candy--probably an overabundance on my part. And much of the pain from arthritis has gone.

As others have said, check with your doctor and/or nutritionist. Your body isn't a science project.


I don't tolerate regular tomatoes either Summer ... they seem too acidic to me BUT I have recently discovered Santini baby plum tomatoes and they are much milder especially the Golden ones ... I don't know if they might be easier?

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Supplements for pain relief 4 months 3 weeks ago #3843594

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cahoots wrote: Thank you for these really helpful replies :xxx:

Especially about turmeric and blood thinners and the calcium info ... strangely milk - even skimmed - makes me itch but I can tolerate yoghurt no problem and have just started having Kefir yoghurt which I am finding beneficial in a couple of ways and it is low in fat too .... and YES we are all different too.

We have a lotta wisdom and good sage advice between us on Buzz but yes of course always check with medical experts ... sometimes there's a lonnnnng waitlist though!!


*Same for me Cahoots, I am dairy intolerant some but not with everything, I also can tolerate yogurt, Keifer's.
Always in parallel with my doctor, including holding off and stopping dairy with the exception of just a few things.
Yes, the itching, can happen very fast with the intake of some dairy products for many...

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Supplements for pain relief 4 months 3 weeks ago #3843618

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www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/health...imate-arthritis-diet

The Ultimate Arthritis Diet

Learn which foods from the Mediterranean diet can help fight inflammation caused by arthritis.
By Amy Paturel

One of the most common questions people with arthritis ask is, “Is there a special arthritis diet?” While there’s no miracle diet for arthritis, many foods can help fight inflammation and improve joint pain and other symptoms.

For starters, a diet rich in whole foods, including fruits, vegetables, fish, nuts and beans, but low processed foods and saturated fat, is not only great for overall health, but can also help manage disease activity. If this advice sounds familiar, it’s because these are the principles of the Mediterranean diet, which is frequently touted for its anti-inflammatory and disease-fighting powers.

Mediterranean Diet

Studies confirm that eating foods commonly part of the Mediterranean diet have the following benefits:
• Lower blood pressure
• Protect against chronic conditions, ranging from cancer to stroke
• Help arthritis by curbing inflammation
• Benefit your joints as well as your heart
• Lead to weight loss, which can lessen joint pain

Here are key foods from the Mediterranean diet and why they’re so good for joint health. Find more nutrition and other information to manage pain with the free Vim app.

Fish

How much: Health authorities like the American Heart Association and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommend three to four ounces of fish, twice a week. Arthritis experts claim more is better.
Why: Some types of fish are good sources of inflammation-fighting omega-3 fatty acids. One study found those who had the highest consumption of omega-3s had lower levels of two inflammatory proteins: C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6. More recently, researchers have shown that taking fish oil supplements helps reduce joint swelling and pain, duration of morning stiffness and disease activity among people who have rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
Best sources: Salmon, tuna, sardines, herring, anchovies, scallops and other cold-water fish. Hate fish? Take a supplement. Studies show that taking 600 to 1,000 mg of fish oil daily eases joint stiffness, tenderness, pain and swelling.

Nuts & Seeds

How much: Eat 1.5 ounces of nuts daily (one ounce is about a handful).
Why: “Multiple studies confirm the role of nuts in an anti-inflammatory diet,” explains José M. Ordovás, PhD, director of nutrition and genomics at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston. One study found that over a 15-year period, men and women who consumed the most nuts had a 51% lower risk of dying from an inflammatory disease (like RA) compared with those who ate the fewest nuts. Another study found that subjects with lower levels of vitamin B6 — found in most nuts — had higher levels of inflammatory markers.
More good news: Nuts are jam-packed with inflammation-fighting monounsaturated fat. And though they’re relatively high in fat and calories, studies show noshing on nuts promotes weight loss because their protein, fiber and monounsaturated fats are satiating. “Just keep in mind that more is not always better,” says Ordovás.
Best sources: Walnuts, pine nuts, pistachios and almonds.

Fruits & Vegetables

How much: Aim for nine or more servings daily (one serving equals one cup of most veggies or fruit or two cups of raw leafy greens).
Why: Fruits and vegetables are loaded with antioxidants. These potent chemicals act as the body’s natural defense system, helping to neutralize unstable molecules called free radicals that can damage cells. Research has shown that anthocyanins found in cherries and other red and purple fruits like strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and blackberries have an anti-inflammatory effect.
More good news: Citrus fruits — like oranges, grapefruits and limes — are rich in vitamin C. Research shows getting the right amount of that vitamin aids in preventing inflammatory arthritis and maintaining healthy joints. Other research suggests eating vitamin K-rich veggies like broccoli, spinach, lettuce, kale and cabbage dramatically reduces inflammatory markers in the blood.
Best sources: Colorful fruits and veggies — the darker or more brilliant the color, the more antioxidants it has. Good ones include blueberries, cherries, spinach, kale and broccoli.

Olive Oil

How much: Two to three tablespoons daily.
Why: Olive oil is loaded with heart-healthy fats, as well as oleocanthal, which has properties similar to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). “Oleocanthal inhibits activity of COX enzymes, with a pharmacological action similar to ibuprofen,” says Ordovás. Inhibiting these enzymes dampens the body’s inflammatory processes and reduces pain sensitivity.
Best sources: Extra virgin olive oil goes through less refining and processing, so it retains more nutrients than standard varieties. And it’s not the only oil with health benefits. Avocado and safflower oils have shown cholesterol-lowering properties, while walnut oil has 10 times the omega-3s that olive oil has.

Beans

How much: About one cup, twice a week (or more).
Why: Beans are loaded with fiber and phytonutrients, which help lower CRP, an indicator of inflammation found in the blood. At high levels, CRP could indicate anything from an infection to RA. In a study scientists analyzed the nutrient content of 10 common bean varieties and identified a host of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds. Beans are also an excellent and inexpensive source of protein and have about 15 grams per cup, which is important for muscle health.
Best sources: Small red beans, red kidney beans and pinto beans rank among the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s top four antioxidant-containing foods (wild blueberries take the number 2 spot).

Whole Grains

How much: Eat a total of six ounces of grains per day; at least three of which should come from whole grains. One ounce of whole grain would be equal to ½ cup cooked brown rice or one slice of whole-wheat bread.
Why: Whole grains contain plenty of filling fiber — which can help you maintain a healthy weight. Some studies have also shown that fiber and fiber-rich foods can lower blood levels of CRP, an inflammatory marker.
Best sources: Eat foods made with the entire grain kernel, like whole-wheat flour, oatmeal, bulgur, brown rice and quinoa. Some people may need to be careful about which whole grains they eat. Gluten — a protein found in wheat and other grains — has been linked to inflammation for people with celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitivity.

Nightshade Vegetables

Why: Nightshade vegetables, including eggplant, tomatoes, red bell peppers and potatoes, are disease-fighting powerhouses that boast maximum nutrition for minimal calories.
Why not: They also contain solanine, a chemical that has been branded the culprit in arthritis pain. There’s no scientific evidence to suggest that nightshades trigger arthritis flares.
Test it: Some experts believe these vegetables contain a potent nutrient mix that helps inhibit arthritis pain. However, many people do report symptom relief when they avoid nightshade vegetables. So, if you notice that your arthritis pain flares after eating them, consider eliminating all nightshade vegetables from your diet for a few weeks to see if it makes a difference. Then slowly add them back into your diet to see if symptoms worsen or stay the same.
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Supplements for pain relief 3 months 4 weeks ago #3853880

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That's brilliant Keeper thank you for posting it .... I have just started taking Omega 3 oil ... crumbs don't they recommend you take a lot ! and the capsules aren't small :ohmy:

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Supplements for pain relief 2 months 3 weeks ago #3867664

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Some combination of glucosamine, condroitin & MSM helps arthritis. Can take 8 weeks to kick in. Don't complain. It took you 50 yrs to get arthritis.

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Supplements for pain relief 1 day 2 hours ago #3895066

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Anti-inflammatory

Niacin-- can have weird side effects

condroitin, MSM, glucosamine -- especially for arthritis. May take several months to kick in. some combinations work better than others.

melatonin

Not a supplement but good for muscle & joint pain/inflammation: OTC Diclofenac cream. A topical NSAID. Very little gets into the blood stream. FDA allows 10% strength. EU has OTC 20%. I bring back hand fulls from EU visits.

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