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TOPIC: Reading anything interesting now, or have read a good book?

Reading anything interesting now, or have read a good book? 1 year 2 months ago #3489488

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I finally have some time off from moving and study - yes! So I'm reading a few novels at present.
One is about a girl who survived the notorious Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp - her father was in the same camp, and he managed to smuggle a wee note to her. She never saw him again however. IDK how those people survived such appalling conditions.
What are you reading at present, or have read that inspired you, or that you just enjoyed?

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Reading anything interesting now, or have read a good book? 1 year 2 months ago #3489490

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I am reading All the Strange Hours, The Excavation of a Life by Loren Eiseley. He was an anthropologist that wrote many books in a fashion that appealed to both the scientific and literary tradition. He lived from 1907-1977. This book is an autobiography.

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Reading anything interesting now, or have read a good book? 1 year 2 months ago #3489502

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Sounds like a good read shadow! We have to get books online here cos there is very limited borrowing time, and only 10 (I think) people allowed in some libraries - most arern't open. we can't even order a book and just pop in to get it - you have to make a time and go between those times.
Hopefully, most of our restrictions will be lifted on the 12 July - hope we stay virus free till then like we are now!

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Reading anything interesting now, or have read a good book? 1 year 2 months ago #3489504

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blackie66 wrote: I finally have some time off from moving and study - yes! So I'm reading a few novels at present.
One is about a girl who survived the notorious Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp - her father was in the same camp, and he managed to smuggle a wee note to her. She never saw him again however. IDK how those people survived such appalling conditions.
What are you reading at present, or have read that inspired you, or that you just enjoyed?



Can I ask the name of the book?

I have read a few true accounts of life in such camps - The seamstress by Sara Tuvel Bernstein is a good one.

At present am reading A single thread by Tracy Chevalier (author of Girl wit ha Pearl Earing) - she writes very readable accounts of different people in various historical settings

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Reading anything interesting now, or have read a good book? 1 year 2 months ago #3489511

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Hi Veggie kid - luv my vegemite and toast in the morning!
The name of the book is: But you did not come back, by Marceline Loridan-Ivens.
You must be an Aussie with a name like that!
I'm Aussie too (well...I was brought here when I was 4 when the oldies emigrated) so consider myself Aussie now :)

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Last edit: by blackie66.

Reading anything interesting now, or have read a good book? 1 year 2 months ago #3489528

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This suffering and injustice was as deplorable as the Holocaust. It reveals the incredibly sad story of the young women who trusted their employers, United States Radium Corporation (USRC) in Orange, New Jersey and the Radium Dial Co of Ottawa, Illinois.
The 1920's saw many changes for women in the United States one of which was women entering the work force. Some young ladies were hired to paint radium on watches to make them luminous. They were taught a technique known as "lip, dip, paint" or "lip pointing". Essentially, redipping the brush in radium and continuing lip, dip and paint clock dials over and over again.
When the girls enquired if this practice was safe, they were repeatedly reassured that it was perfectly safe. Even when the employees began loosing teeth, breaking bones, limping and even dying the effects of radium were hidden from them. At one point, cause of death was reported as syphilis.
The painful and harrowing journey of the young ladies affected by what later was referred to as Radium Poisoning is remarkable and the contribution they made to science, often posthumously , is a testament to their fortitude and strength, demonstrated at their weakest point.
One of thousands of reviews....
bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
First of all, I can't believe I didn't know about the 'radium girls'. Everybody should know about these women who were told that ingesting radioactive paint was harmless and were then treated like dirt by their employers and the law when they got sick in the most horrendous ways and eventually died. Secondly, now that I do know, I AM SO MAD!

During the First World War, the Radium Luminous Material Corporation - later renamed the United States Radium Corporation - was founded in New York, and a factory in Newark, New Jersey, hired young girls - some were under sixteen - to paint the 'luminescent' numbers on watch and clock dials, which were hugely popular at the time. The only problem was that the glow in the dark effect was produced by radium, which is obviously highly radioactive and when ingested goes straight to the bones and either decays or mutates into cancerous growths. And the men behind the industry KNEW this, but let the women in their employ play around with the paint and lick the tiny brushes to maintain a point on the bristles - lip, dip and paint. When the women started showing signs of radium poisoning - from teeth falling out and rotting jaws to aching bones and growths - the USRC denied all knowledge and employed company doctors to attribute the early deaths (the first to die were in their twenties) to conditions like diphtheria and syphilis! The industry bosses and their lawyers lied and cheated and ignored these women for years, and were allowed to get away with such treatment because radium equalled money and money is obviously worth more than human lives in the American Dream, but also because these young women from poor backgrounds - in Newark and also Ottawa, Illinois, where the Radium Dial Company was guilty of the same crimes - were considered expendable. Only when the first man died of radium poisoning in 1925 did anyone start asking questions. Honestly, Kate Moore's writing is a little flowery at times - I though this might be a contemporary account from the 1920s to start with! - but the emotion in her delivery certainly packs a punch. I HATED these men, from the lying bosses to the dismissive doctors (and the 'doctor' for the USRC wasn't even an MD but a PhD!), and was so glad when Grace Fryer and Catherine Donahue finally found lawyers to fight for them, even though they were already facing their own death sentences. What utter stinking capitalist cowards, 'which cared nothing for the lives of their workers, but only sought to guard their profits'!
The suffering of the women was actually traumatic to read, and their graves are still radioactive today, but I was even more startled to read that the company which took over from the notorious USRC - Luminous Processes - only folded in 1978, and that the land where these factories were based was still being 'cleaned up' well into the twenty-first century. I am absolutely flabbergasted that anyone could think, 'Yes, a woman's jaw actually broke off and another had to have her arm amputated. These women were strong and selfless heroines and their story should not be forgotten.
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Reading anything interesting now, or have read a good book? 1 year 2 months ago #3489546

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Hi yes I remember seeing a doco (documentary) on this years ago. It was terrible what they went through, and I think they were just dismissed as 'hysterical women'.
But then again, the world is ruled by men and many women are still in subjugation to them. I personally believe many women put themselves in subjugation to men - and single women like me are always worse off and ignored more than partnered or married women.

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Reading anything interesting now, or have read a good book? 1 year 2 months ago #3489566

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But then again, the world is ruled by men and many women are still in subjugation to them. I personally believe many women put themselves in subjugation to men - and single women like me are always worse off and ignored more than partnered or married women.[/quote]

I find your reply interesting. I had to give it a little thought, as I have had just the opposite experience. I’ve been in relationships all my life (35+ yrs married) looking back it was like a Prison compared to the last couple Years I’ve felt the freedom of being single, I only have to answer to myself at the end of the day.
l determine my self worth, the freedom to pursue hobbies I enjoy, to choose what brings me joy. I think we’re all deserve to feel loved and cherished whether we find it in partnership or within ourselves. smile.png

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Last edit: by Rose57.

Reading anything interesting now, or have read a good book? 1 year 2 months ago #3489597

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my last book....an amazing read.

The Flamboya Tree
by Clara Olink Kelly.

biography, of clara's childhood with her mother & siblings,& father...being taken from wealth in java to a Japanese concentration camp for 4 yrs, all they endured.
not even being told the war had ended ! ....she and her own adult family live in uk .

i highly recommend.

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Last edit: by Dee Dee.

Reading anything interesting now, or have read a good book? 1 year 2 months ago #3489684

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blackie66 wrote: Hi Veggie kid - luv my vegemite and toast in the morning!
The name of the book is: But you did not come back, by Marceline Loridan-Ivens.
You must be an Aussie with a name like that!
I'm Aussie too (well...I was brought here when I was 4 when the oldies emigrated) so consider myself Aussie now :)



Thank you I will keep an eye out for it.

Yes I am in Australia - regional South Australia, to be exact smile.png .
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