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TOPIC: John Robert Lewis last march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge

John Robert Lewis last march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge 2 months 4 days ago #3501425

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Very humble, very impressive.

Another good man left us.
LEAVER DEA AS SLAEF !
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John Robert Lewis last march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge 2 months 1 day ago #3503128

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Annette wrote: Very humble, very impressive.

Another good man left us.


Hear hear. A man who fought for freedom through non violent civil disobedience.
They need to pull down a Confederate General's statue and erect one of John Lewis in it's place!
“Someone has said that it requires less mental effort to condemn than to think.”
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John Robert Lewis last march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge 2 months 22 hours ago #3503166

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altshovel wrote:

Annette wrote: Very humble, very impressive.

Another good man left us.


Hear hear. A man who fought for freedom through non violent civil disobedience.
They need to pull down a Confederate General's statue and erect one of John Lewis in it's place!


I know this may seem an odd thing to say, and I totally agree a statue to this man may be warmly welcomed, but could putting his statue next to a Confederate Generals statue have any merit?

Obviously it could upset both sides by doing so, but any man fighting bravely in your civil war isn't being celebrated so much for their views on slavery as their standing in the community. :unsure: .

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John Robert Lewis last march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge 2 months 19 hours ago #3503196

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Excuse me, Grahamg, this is about the burial of John Robert Lewis, lets not make it political.

The burial site of former slaves and their children, the first free-born Blacks, will serve as the final resting place for the man who fought to make his ancestors proud and change the landscape for future generations.

The significance of his life, devoted to fighting for social and economic equality for people of color and the LGBTQIA community, is evident by the six-day celebration of life that has marked his legacy in cities including Washington, Selma, Alabama, and Atlanta. Much like his elaborate series of memorial ceremonies, his burial site also speaks volumes about the life he lived.

South-View Cemetery sits south of Atlanta, about 15 minutes from downtown. It was founded in 1886 as a respectable burial place for the formerly enslaved Black people who had been mistreated and kept out of the segregated cemeteries. It dates back to the tumultuous years of Reconstruction after the final battles of the Civil War, according to the South-View Cemetery Association website.

Finding a place for freed slaves to be buried was particularly difficult in Atlanta, where Gen. William T. Sherman had set fires across the South and Atlanta during that time. Despite the destruction, the Black community in Atlanta sought to build schools for their children, hospitals to care for the sick, businesses, and dignified places for their loved ones to be buried.

Two of the cemetery’s most notable included Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Dr. Benjamin Mays. Both men were laid to rest at South-View before being moved to the Martin Luther King Center and Morehouse College, respectively. Lt. Henry O. Flipper, the first African American to graduate from the West Point Military Academy and famed “Buffalo Soldier,” was laid to rest in 1940 at South-View until his full military honors were restored in 1978. He was later placed at the military cemetery near his home in Thomasville.

Obama will attend the service alongside former Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton, according to multiple reports. The funeral for the civil rights icon and longtime Georgia lawmaker will be held at 11 a.m. at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta.

LEAVER DEA AS SLAEF !
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John Robert Lewis last march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge 2 months 18 hours ago #3503227

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No offence intended to anyone, certainly not!

A politician and from all I know of him, an excellent man has died, but without putting words into anyone's mouth, I'd guess most experienced politicians might recognise their passing, or the passing of another leading figure has significance politically(?).
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John Robert Lewis last march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge 2 months 15 hours ago #3503279

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John Robert Lewis´ last words:

"While my time here has now come to an end, I want you to know that in the last days and hours of my life you inspired me. You filled me with hope about the next chapter of the great American story when you used your power to make a difference in our society. Millions of people motivated simply by human compassion laid down the burdens of division. Around the country and the world you set aside race, class, age, language and nationality to demand respect for human dignity.

That is why I had to visit Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington, though I was admitted to the hospital the following day. I just had to see and feel it for myself that, after many years of silent witness, the truth is still marching on.

Emmett Till was my George Floyd. He was my Rayshard Brooks, Sandra Bland and Breonna Taylor. He was 14 when he was killed, and I was only 15 years old at the time. I will never ever forget the moment when it became so clear that he could easily have been me. In those days, fear constrained us like an imaginary prison, and troubling thoughts of potential brutality committed for no understandable reason were the bars.

Though I was surrounded by two loving parents, plenty of brothers, sisters and cousins, their love could not protect me from the unholy oppression waiting just outside that family circle. Unchecked, unrestrained violence and government-sanctioned terror had the power to turn a simple stroll to the store for some Skittles or an innocent morning jog down a lonesome country road into a nightmare. If we are to survive as one unified nation, we must discover what so readily takes root in our hearts that could rob Mother Emanuel Church in South Carolina of her brightest and best, shoot unwitting concertgoers in Las Vegas and choke to death the hopes and dreams of a gifted violinist like Elijah McClain.

Like so many young people today, I was searching for a way out, or some might say a way in, and then I heard the voice of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on an old radio. He was talking about the philosophy and discipline of nonviolence. He said we are all complicit when we tolerate injustice. He said it is not enough to say it will get better by and by. He said each of us has a moral obligation to stand up, speak up and speak out. When you see something that is not right, you must say something. You must do something. Democracy is not a state. It is an act, and each generation must do its part to help build what we called the Beloved Community, a nation and world society at peace with itself.

Ordinary people with extraordinary vision can redeem the soul of America by getting in what I call good trouble, necessary trouble. Voting and participating in the democratic process are key. The vote is the most powerful nonviolent change agent you have in a democratic society. You must use it because it is not guaranteed. You can lose it.

You must also study and learn the lessons of history because humanity has been involved in this soul-wrenching, existential struggle for a very long time. People on every continent have stood in your shoes, though decades and centuries before you. The truth does not change, and that is why the answers worked out long ago can help you find solutions to the challenges of our time. Continue to build union between movements stretching across the globe because we must put away our willingness to profit from the exploitation of others.

Though I may not be here with you, I urge you to answer the highest calling of your heart and stand up for what you truly believe. In my life I have done all I can to demonstrate that the way of peace, the way of love and nonviolence is the more excellent way. Now it is your turn to let freedom ring.

When historians pick up their pens to write the story of the 21st century, let them say that it was your generation who laid down the heavy burdens of hate at last and that peace finally triumphed over violence, aggression and war. So I say to you, walk with the wind, brothers and sisters, and let the spirit of peace and the power of everlasting love be your guide."
LEAVER DEA AS SLAEF !
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John Robert Lewis last march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge 2 months 6 hours ago #3503481

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grahamg wrote:

altshovel wrote:

Annette wrote: Very humble, very impressive.

Another good man left us.


Hear hear. A man who fought for freedom through non violent civil disobedience.
They need to pull down a Confederate General's statue and erect one of John Lewis in it's place!


I know this may seem an odd thing to say, and I totally agree a statue to this man may be warmly welcomed, but could putting his statue next to a Confederate Generals statue have any merit?

Obviously it could upset both sides by doing so, but any man fighting bravely in your civil war isn't being celebrated so much for their views on slavery as their standing in the community. :unsure: .


Sure, you could put up a plaque next to the Confederate general saying this guy fought for the enslavement of black people and refer to the John Lewis statue saying he fought for the freedom of all people.
“Someone has said that it requires less mental effort to condemn than to think.”
The following user(s) said Well Said: Annette

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John Robert Lewis last march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge 2 months 5 hours ago #3503518

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I watched the funeral and was moved by the speeches.

This was a man most deserving of all the accolades given and I sincerely hope that the American people make their votcs count thus helping to heal the divisions that have been so prevalent in the last few years.
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John Robert Lewis last march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge 2 months 5 hours ago #3503519

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And wonderful eulogy by Obama, imo
The following user(s) said Well Said: Annette, Pats, Elspeth

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John Robert Lewis last march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge 1 month 4 weeks ago #3503619

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Even Bush came, although they have not exactly eye to eye.
But it makes clear one can have respect for somebody else, even if the other does not agree with ones ideas.

Jimmy Carter send a letter to be read by the reverend, and Bill Clinton had some funny and serious stories.

And as far as the current prezz is concerned, well, he has respect for nobody except himself. He wasnt missed.
LEAVER DEA AS SLAEF !
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